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 Yellow Corn vs. Blue Corn vs. White Corn for long term storage..... New question 3/27....
Bed_Head  [Team Member]
3/21/2008 9:24:02 AM EST
What's the difference? I'm not finding a ton of info online.

I'd like to store a couple hundred pounds of it for my family, but I'm not sure which kind would be best. Yellow is the kind I would imagine I'm used to seeing, but if there's a benefit (nutritional, storage, etc) to one of the others, I'd like to know.

Thanks!
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SultanOfBrunei  [Member]
3/21/2008 9:30:18 AM EST
My guess is that it depends on what you are trying to do with it. But as far as color goes, you'll want yellow. I am not an expert, and I do not have any corn stored at this point.

www.survival-center.com/foodfaq/ff3-grai.htm#Corn


Once you've decided between flint, dent or popcorn, you now have to decide upon it's color: There are yellow, white, blue, & red dried varieties. The yellow and white types are the most common by far with the blues and reds mostly being relegated to curiosities, though blue corn has been gaining in popularity these last few years. It should be kept in mind that white corn does not have the carotene (converts into vitamin A) content of yellow corn. Since vitamin A is one of the major limiting vitamins in long term food storage, any possible source of it should be utilized so for this reason I suggest storing yellow rather than white corn. Additionally, much of the niacin content of corn is chemically bound up in a form not available for human nutrition unless it has been treated with an alkali. If grits, hominy or corn masa (for torillas and tamales) are not a part of your diet and you're storing corn, it is a very good idea to begin to develop a taste for some or all of these alkali treated forms of corn foods.


Bed_Head  [Team Member]
3/21/2008 10:07:53 AM EST
Thanks! I can't believe I haven't visited that website.....

But what does that mean to be treated with alkaline? (I'm sorry if that's a stupid question....)
SultanOfBrunei  [Member]
3/21/2008 10:28:18 AM EST
Not sure about the alkali... anyone else?

ETA: found this www.zarela.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=185


Remember these two words well, for they are almost the soul of Mexican cooking. If you took away every other flavor -- even chile -- the smell and taste of masa made from nixtamal would call up something ancestral. "Masa" is just the Spanish word for "dough", but to any Mexican it means first and foremost the moist corn dough for tortillas, tamales, small dumplings, and all manner of antojitos. The corn is not ground into dough until it has first been dried and then turned into nixtamal:-- hominy-like kernels that have swelled and acquired a new savor by soaking in an alkali solution. The first people of Mexico used ashes dissolved in water. Today the standard alkali for the nixtamalizing process is purified cal, or calcium hydroxide. (It is sold by the ounce at many U.S. drugstores.)
ralphie14  [Team Member]
3/21/2008 10:45:35 AM EST

Originally Posted By Bed_Head:
Thanks! I can't believe I haven't visited that website.....

But what does that mean to be treated with alkaline? (I'm sorry if that's a stupid question....)


I am sure the southerners can offer more info but this is what I found with my google-foo. A long excerpt but it lets you know what is going on.

southernfood.about.com/cs/gritsrecipes/a/grits_recipes.htm


Hominy grits, or just plain grits, are an institution here in the South, though they can be hard to find in northern states. Hominy is made from flint or dent corn,varieties with hard kernels that are dried on the cob then removed and soaked in a solution of baking soda, lime, or wood ash. This process causes the hulls to soften and swell. The kernels are then hulled and degermed using friction, then dried. Grits, coarse whitish grains, are ground from hominy, as is masa harina, the flour used to make corn tortillas. If you really want to start from scratch, Mountain Laurel has instructions for the whole process, including making the lye solution with wood ashes.
It's interesting that the alkaline soaking process also unbinds necessary niacin in the corn, and has an effect on the protein balance. Though the overall available protein is decreased, the relative availability of the lysine and tryptophan are increased. The alkaline process has been used for centuries where corn was a native food, but in areas where corn was introduced as a new staple, the process was not. Pellagra, a niacin and tryptophan deficiency, became common disease in areas where corn was the main source of food, as in the early South. One has to wonder how ancient civilizations discovered the process which made corn a more balanced source of nutrition.
Ron_Brooks  [Team Member]
3/21/2008 11:09:34 AM EST
Soak it in pickling lime, the chemical not the fruit. Helps you get more nutriotn from the corn
SultanOfBrunei  [Member]
3/21/2008 11:11:53 AM EST
So, if you are storing corn do you also need to store lime?
Bed_Head  [Team Member]
3/21/2008 12:28:10 PM EST
Or would baking soda work just as well, I wonder......


This is something I'd never even thought about. I vaguely remember hearing references to native Americans soaking their corn/grain in water and ashes before, but I never cared why. I don't do any cooking with that kind of corn. Time to expand my horizons again.
CancerLad  [Member]
3/21/2008 6:11:52 PM EST
Baking soda is not the same thing as lime. Baking soda is a neutralizer, which brings the pH of acids and bases close to a neutral 7. Alkali chemicals are basic, with a pH of 10 or more and they feel slippery between the fingers. Alkali solutions are commonly used in the food processing industry to take the skins off of veggies.
Ron_Brooks  [Team Member]
3/21/2008 6:32:40 PM EST

Originally Posted By SultanOfBrunei:
So, if you are storing corn do you also need to store lime?


Sure wouldn't hurt. Pickling lime or lye will work, but the pickling lime is safer. Need to practice doing it before you have to, so when or if you mess up you can run down to the store and get some more supplies.
EndGame  [Member]
3/21/2008 8:10:47 PM EST
If I remember correctly, Alton Brown (on Good Eats) said that baking soda will work but it takes a long time. Like several days. Lime was considerably faster, and lye was faster still. When you're done soaking, remember to rinse the corn very, very well, especially if you're using lye.
Bed_Head  [Team Member]
3/27/2008 8:46:52 AM EST
The hubby brought up a good point last night that I wanted to ask y'all....

Is there any benefit of storing whole corn kernals over corn meal? I can order big bags of it either way and don't really know which is better.

And this might be a dumb question too, but can I (or have any of you) run corn meal through my mill and make corn flour?

To be honest, other than cornbread, I hardly ever use the stuff and I don't know what I'd need in the future if I had to live completely off of my food storage.....


Thanks.
SultanOfBrunei  [Member]
3/27/2008 9:02:44 AM EST

Originally Posted By Bed_Head:
Is there any benefit of storing whole corn kernals over corn meal?


Processed foods will not store as long. Corn meal is processed, I think it will last half as long, but i am sure someone will be along soon and post better info.
Bed_Head  [Team Member]
3/31/2008 9:32:14 AM EST
I found some great info on corn meal vs. whole corn....




The cornmeal you buy in the store is also most likely made from yellow dent corn. However, nutritionally speaking, there's a big difference between the corn meal you can buy in the store and freshly ground corn meal you grind yourself at home. There's a couple of reasons for this. In store-bought corn flour or meal, the outer skin (a great source of fiber) and the germ which is loaded with nutrients has been removed. The grain millers particularly like to remove the germ as it contains the oils that quickly go rancid - something they don't want to happen before you get their cornmeal home and used. Unfortunately, it also contains many of the vitamins and minerals that make corn so healthy. And just like white wheat flour, because they have taken so many nutrients out during the milling process, they'll chuck some cheap, un-chelated minerals back in to make it look like the customer is buying a healthy product.


Link:
www.aaoobfoods.com/graininfo.htm#Amaranth


Looks like we'll be loading up on the whole corn.
SGTCap  [Team Member]
3/31/2008 11:13:36 AM EST
IS there any difference between "regular" dried corn and fed or deer corn? I can get bags of corn dirt cheap at the local feed store but is it worth eating?

ETA I cant imagine what the difference would be but I figure I should ask.
SGTCap  [Team Member]
4/29/2008 8:01:42 PM EST
bump for another chance at an answer
NoStockBikes  [Team Member]
4/29/2008 8:11:30 PM EST

Originally Posted By SGTCap:
IS there any difference between "regular" dried corn and fed or deer corn?


I don't think so. As long as it isn't treated (innoculated for germination rates, etc) it should be regular old corn.
EndGame  [Member]
4/29/2008 9:13:44 PM EST
To the best of my knowledge the only difference is that the animal feed corn is subject to less rigorous inspections, meaning that you might find a few more mouse turds or insect wings than would be present in corn intended for human use. Sounds kinda gross, but it's really not a big deal if you give it a quick wash. Seed corn is another matter because it probably has chemicals you don't want to eat.
CanadianDave  [Member]
4/29/2008 9:32:11 PM EST
Where would I get dried corn locally? Also, is popping corn able to be used in making cornmeal?
EXPY37  [Member]
4/29/2008 10:35:44 PM EST
Tell you one thing, masa is in WM, is cheap [for now] and there are a lot of tasty things you can do w/ it.

High in calories for the weight and volume.

About when I was experimenting w/ it I made small rolls on a hot plate and they were tasty.

To prepare it just add water to make a dough.

I've got some put away in the store bags for about 2 yrs now, maybe I'll try it and report.


Nutrition Facts

Serving size 1/2 cup or 2 oz

Calories 208(Kilojoules 870)

% DV**
Total Fat 2.2 g 3%
Sat. Fat 0.3 g 2%
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 3 mg 0%
Total Carbs. 43.5 g 14%
Dietary Fiber 5.5 g 22%
Sugars 0.4 g
Protein 5.3 g
Calcium 80.4 mg
Potassium 169.9 mg

Add some beans and rice and you've got a meal I think.


FordGuy  [Team Member]
4/30/2008 4:17:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By SultanOfBrunei:

Originally Posted By Bed_Head:
Is there any benefit of storing whole corn kernals over corn meal?


Processed foods will not store as long. Corn meal is processed, I think it will last half as long, but i am sure someone will be along soon and post better info.


yeah, easier to spot weevils and they have a harder time eating.
warlord  [Member]
4/30/2008 6:41:06 AM EST

Originally Posted By SultanOfBrunei:

Originally Posted By Bed_Head:
Is there any benefit of storing whole corn kernals over corn meal?


Processed foods will not store as long. Corn meal is processed, I think it will last half as long, but i am sure someone will be along soon and post better info.
O2 is a friend and enemy. O2 is the cause of rancidness. That is because there is a large amount of surface area, and O2 will attack it. I understand that there are some molds that will grow in absence of O2, me for long term storage of food, I would put in O2 and H2O absorbers, and seal the mylar bag.
Bed_Head  [Team Member]
4/30/2008 8:07:38 AM EST
I saw big ol' bags of 'cracked corn' feed at Walmart a couple weeks ago and wondered if I could store it for my family.... that's why I was asking about it. But I think just to be safe I may spend the extra $$ and get the bulk bags meant for people.
BenDover  [Team Member]
4/30/2008 8:17:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By Bed_Head:
I saw big ol' bags of 'cracked corn' feed at Walmart a couple weeks ago and wondered if I could store it for my family.... that's why I was asking about it. But I think just to be safe I may spend the extra $$ and get the bulk bags meant for people.


If you want cracked corn, you can get it for ultra cheap at your local co-op or feed store much cheaper than even Wally World.

I'm paying $10.70 for 100 pounds of straight cracked feed corn right now.
warlord  [Member]
4/30/2008 2:52:33 PM EST

Originally Posted By BenDover:

Originally Posted By Bed_Head:
I saw big ol' bags of 'cracked corn' feed at Walmart a couple weeks ago and wondered if I could store it for my family.... that's why I was asking about it. But I think just to be safe I may spend the extra $$ and get the bulk bags meant for people.


If you want cracked corn, you can get it for ultra cheap at your local co-op or feed store much cheaper than even Wally World.

I'm paying $10.70 for 100 pounds of straight cracked feed corn right now.
From what I personally understand, food for human consumption is made under more stringent conditions that food for non-humans. Don't know if it is true or not, but since we are not under dire SHtF conditions, I would get the stuff meant for human consumption and not animal feed.
trwoprod  [Team Member]
4/30/2008 5:07:48 PM EST

Originally Posted By CanadianDave:
Where would I get dried corn locally? Also, is popping corn able to be used in making cornmeal?


Popcorn makes good cornmeal. It's just corn, after all. A little grittier, though, unless you mill it fine. Get some at a store (unsalted) and see for yourself.
BamaTrapper  [Member]
4/30/2008 5:46:50 PM EST
My local granary grinds high end organic grits for expensive restaurants and hotels. I mentioned to him that I might have constructed a 'water distiller' and inquired about what type of corn he used for his grits. "Yellow dent, triple cleaned" - followed by the comment "this corn's too good to be turned into whiskey - cheap corn will work just fine".

I store yellow dent and blue Hopi corn. The yellow dent grinds well and isn't oily. The Blue Hopi has a far higher protein content. Mixed together and used in conjunction with Bronze Chief wheat - it makes a very hearty and filling corn bread.
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