AR15.Com Archives
 Missed a .45 after three searches
Bama-Shooter  [Team Member]
4/13/2009 11:03:51 AM
Lawyer to decide whether Anderson councilman will face gun charge
THE STAR PRESS • • April 13, 2009

ANDERSON –– A Delaware County attorney will decide whether a felony gun charge will be filed against an Anderson politician.

J.A. Cummins –– Delaware County's chief deputy prosecutor from 1991 through 2006 –– last week was appointed senior prosecutor in the case of Ollie H. Dixon Sr., who is in his fifth term as an Anderson City Council member.

Dixon, 60, was arrested for drunken driving on Anderson's Scatterfield Road on March 28.

A portable breath test measured Dixon's blood-alcohol level at 0.20 percent.

The Anderson City Council member was taken to the Madison County jail. Shortly after he was booked in, a fellow inmate in the jail's detoxification unit reported to jail guards that Dixon had a handgun.

The .45-caliber handgun, which Dixon had a license to carry, was recovered without incident.

Authorities said Dixon had been searched for weapons three times before being placed in the cell.


Sheriff Ron Richardson has recommended the councilman be charged with prisoner in possession of a dangerous weapon, a Class B felony carrying a standard 10-year prison term.

In requesting that a special prosecutor be appointed to the case, Madison County Prosecutor Thomas Broderick Jr. noted that Dixon's daughter works in the prosecutor's office.

A misdemeanor driving-while-intoxicated charge has already been filed against Dixon in Anderson City Court, with trial set for June 30.

Dixon was convicted of driving while intoxicated in 1989 and public intoxication in 1990.

http://www.thestarpress.com/article/20090413/NEWS01/904130323/1002

Somebody needs a serious ass chewing and some remedail training.
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us-kiwi  [Team Member]
4/13/2009 11:28:36 AM
Holy Shit.
Just reading this is pretty freaky.
This happened to me, 15 years ago.

Briefly, got stopped for speeding, LEO decided I was his
'DWI of the evening'.
Got cuffed, searched, car tossed, including tool chest in trunk.

Back to station, searched again, booked, refused to blow,
(in those days, local LEO did not have the portable stuff)
then the 'empty pockets, belt, shoelaces, etc' stuff,
searched again, placed in cell for the remainder of night.

Bailed out next morning by my attorney, who confirmed that
I had a G19 in a small-of-back holster.

After a lot of behind-the-scenes discussions,
Police chief's major issue was
"How did I smuggle a G19 into the cells?
The safety of our officers is real important to us"
I replied "What about the safety of the general public?"

Silence.

All charges were dropped, except the speeding- 45 in a 40 zone.

90 days suspension + $450 fine for the speed

LEO made Sargent 18 months later. WTF?

And some people wonder why I have a somewhat jaded view
of LEO - sometimes. Present company excepted, of course.
Most of the LEO on this site seem to be very GTG.

More details are available if anybody is interested.
I dont tell the story very often, but this post was just
'too close to home' to not make a comment.
XxEMPTY_MAGxX  [Member]
4/13/2009 11:28:45 AM
We had a guy sit in the PD holding cell for 6 hours, then transported to us in the county jail. When he got to us we asked if he had anything in his pockets. He drunkingly said yes and pulled out a .38 special cartridge. The SGT. ask "You dont have the gun to go with it do you?" He says hell yeah and pulls a 38 out of his jacket. So we escorted him to the ground real gently. Thats was pretty crazy seeing that he sat in the pd cell for 6 hours and road in a patrol car with 2 different officers.
hkusp9  [Member]
4/13/2009 12:03:31 PM
I think i say this too much around my shift, Its crude and childish but its the only thing thats short and blunt enough to grab officers attention and make them remember it....

GRAB SOME FUCKING NUTS!!!

Guys dont often forget that line. There was a city officer here about a year ago that tried to book a guy into the city jail with a full sized sig pistol in the front of his waistband. Alot of guys will shy around the crotch area because they're uncomfortable around another guys nuts. I dont like them either, but the thought of cruising to jail and getting popped in the back of the head by my prisoner at a stoplight is much worse.

Also dont search your arrestees for guns and knives, search them for teeny tiny bags of coke and single exstacy pills. I guarantee that if you're searching them hardcore for little stuff it will be hard to miss the stuff thats huge by comparison.

Also, search EVERYONE you lay hands on, screw that last officer thats giving you this prisoner who gets offended becuase he just told you he searched that guy and wants to know if you think he doesnt know how to do his job. Ive found stuff on dudes that other guys missed. Ive found stuff on my OWN prisoners and the jailers have found stuff that Ive missed. I had a dude once with a joint behind his ear that i found while doing SFST's on station video at the station that i missed on the street in the dark. He had short hair so i didnt look and the thick earpiece on his big sunglasses hid it. I didnt even look at his head since his hair was cut real short and it was hiding there behind the sunglasses arm. He was so drunk he forgot it was there. I caught it before booking. I also had another guy where the jailers doing booking took off his shoes that i had just searched and searched them again. This time they pulled out foam cushion that was still partially glued in the inside of the shoe and found a really small bag of weed in there. I felt real stupid for missing that one.

Ive found dope hidden in guys butt cracks that other officers have missed too.
bgenlvtex  [Member]
4/13/2009 1:01:45 PM
Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:The .45-caliber handgun, which Dixon had a license to carry, was recovered without incident.

Authorities said Dixon had been searched for weapons three times before being placed in the cell.

Sheriff Ron Richardson has recommended the councilman be charged with prisoner in possession of a dangerous weapon, a Class B felony carrying a standard 10-year prison term.


"As a direct result of our inneptitude we are charging you with felony possession."



HKocher  [Team Member]
4/13/2009 1:11:34 PM
Bailed out next morning by my attorney, who confirmed that
I had a G19 in a small-of-back holster.


Obviously the arresting/searching officer screwed up royally by not finding the gun on your person. That being said, in my state, it's a felony to knowingly bring/possess a firearm into a jail/corrections facility. Doesn't matter if the officer missed it in the search, you still knowly brought it into a control environment. Therefore you also screwed up royally by not informing the officer(s) of the gun. I'm very surprised they didn't charge you with a weapons offence.

If I were the supervisor, that officer would have been suspended, but you would also be hit with the felony for sure.

On offense, but you both f'ed up, and both got lucky you didn't face more serious consequences.


HKocher  [Team Member]
4/13/2009 1:16:30 PM
Originally Posted By bgenlvtex:
Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:The .45-caliber handgun, which Dixon had a license to carry, was recovered without incident.

Authorities said Dixon had been searched for weapons three times before being placed in the cell.

Sheriff Ron Richardson has recommended the councilman be charged with prisoner in possession of a dangerous weapon, a Class B felony carrying a standard 10-year prison term.


"As a direct result of our inneptitude we are charging you with felony possession."





Like I said above, the searching officer(s) screwed the pooch by not finding the gun, but that doesn't change the fact that the offender knowingly brought a firearm into a prohibited area. You can't claim ignorance on this one. How many jurors would believe the line: "I didn't know I couldn't bring a gun with me to jail."? Just because the officer made a mistake, doesn't give you the right to violate the law. If someone smuggles a bomb onto a plane, does he get a freebie since the TSA folks missed it during screeening?

bgenlvtex  [Member]
4/13/2009 1:38:18 PM
Originally Posted By HKocher:
Originally Posted By bgenlvtex:
Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:The .45-caliber handgun, which Dixon had a license to carry, was recovered without incident.

Authorities said Dixon had been searched for weapons three times before being placed in the cell.

Sheriff Ron Richardson has recommended the councilman be charged with prisoner in possession of a dangerous weapon, a Class B felony carrying a standard 10-year prison term.


"As a direct result of our inneptitude we are charging you with felony possession."





Like I said above, the searching officer(s) screwed the pooch by not finding the gun, but that doesn't change the fact that the offender knowingly brought a firearm into a prohibited area. You can't claim ignorance on this one. How many jurors would believe the line: "I didn't know I couldn't bring a gun with me to jail."? Just because the officer made a mistake, doesn't give you the right to violate the law. If someone smuggles a bomb onto a plane, does he get a freebie since the TSA folks missed it during screeening?



I understand what you are saying and agree in principle. That said this reeks of a Sheriff trying to divert attention from their inneptitude and embarassment by making a scene of it. When another prisoner reported it it was recovered without event.So what happened here? The other prisoner conducted a more thorough search then the deputy?

The smuggling analogy isn't quite accurate. It's not like he was going to the station with nefarious purpose and smuggled it in.He was picked up on a .20 dui so he was pretty loopy and entirely possible that he was borderline incoherant depending on how he handles his alchohol.

I suppose if he was sober AND asked if he had any weapons in his possession and denied that he did I would view it differently.


BiteDog  [Member]
4/13/2009 1:57:48 PM
Glad this guy didn't decide to use it inside the secure area.

The body count would have been high before he was neutralized.


It might be time for a refresher course on the 10 Deadly Sins of Police Officers.

1. Lack of Concentration: If you fail to keep your mind on the job while on patrol or carry home problems into the field, you start to make errors. It can cost you and your fellow officers their lives.

2. Tombstone Courage: Just what it says, if time allows wait for backup. There are very few instances where you should try and make a dangerous apprehension unaided.

3. Not Enough Rest: to do your job you must be alert. Lack of sleep or being sleepy can endanger yourself, the community and fellow officers.

4. Taking a Bad Position: Never let anyone you are questioning or about to stop get in a better position than you are. THERE IS NO SUCH ANIMAL AS A ROUTINE STOP!!!

5. Not Heeding the Danger Signs: As a cop you will get to recognize "danger signs". Movements, strange cars, warnings that should alert you to watch your step and approach with caution. Know your beat and watch for what is out of place.

6. Failure to Watch the Hands of a Suspect: Is he or she reaching for a weapon or getting to smack you? WHERE ELSE CAN A KILLER STRIKE FROM, BUT FROM THEIR HANDS!!!!

7. Relaxing Too Soon: YES, the rut of false alarms are accidental or whatever. Still, observe the activity. NEVER take any call as routine or just another false alarm. It could be your ass on the line.

8. Improper Handcuffing: Once you have made the arrest, handcuff the prisoner CORRECTLY! See that the hands that can kill you are safely secured.

9. No Search or Bad Search: There are too many places to hide a weapon that if you fail to search you are guilty of committing a crime against other officers that will have contact with your prisoner. Many people carry weapons and are able and ready to use them on you. Never assume that the next guy or the jailer will do a "GOOD" search.

10. Dirty or Inoperative Weapon: Is your sidearm clean? How about the bullets? Did you clean your weapon since the last range? Or have you even shot or practiced drawing your weapon recently? Can you hit your target in a combat situation? You must practice faithfully and religiously.
shadow12  [Member]
4/13/2009 3:40:13 PM
When I was a rookie, I arrested a loud mouth drunk. Cuffed him, searched him and took him to the PD, ghen we bot there, he pulled a knife out of his back pocket and handed it to me. I learned real dang quick, I will search your ass crack if I need to, I will find whatever you have. And prior to taking anyone into the jail, I ask them if I missed anything, "If they find it inside, it's a felony". I always put that in my report also. If they get busted because I did miss something, it is on them now.
HKocher  [Team Member]
4/14/2009 12:17:35 PM
Originally Posted By bgenlvtex:

I understand what you are saying and agree in principle. That said this reeks of a Sheriff trying to divert attention from their inneptitude and embarassment by making a scene of it. When another prisoner reported it it was recovered without event.So what happened here? The other prisoner conducted a more thorough search then the deputy?

The smuggling analogy isn't quite accurate. It's not like he was going to the station with nefarious purpose and smuggled it in.He was picked up on a .20 dui so he was pretty loopy and entirely possible that he was borderline incoherant depending on how he handles his alchohol.

I suppose if he was sober AND asked if he had any weapons in his possession and denied that he did I would view it differently.




I don't really view it as an attempt to divert attention. If they really would have wanted to do that, why didn't they just keep things quiet and handle the matter internally? Punish the searching deputy (or not), but don't charge the offender and keep the whole matter out of the media's attention.

The way I look at it, you've got two completely separate issues here. First, you've got a criminal matter with the offender bringing the weapon into a secure facility. Second, you've got a department policy violation (probably multiple) with the searching deputy missing the gun. If I'm the sheriff, I would address both issues. The deputy gets punished according to dept. guidelines, the offender gets the criminal charge. There's no other way to do it if you ask me. Obviously the offender isn't bound by dept. policy, and the deputy (despite his apparent inneptitude) didn't do anything criminal in this incident.

Like I said, the fact that the deputy missed the gun, doesn't change the fact that the offender violated the law by bringing the gun into the jail. We don't know the intentions of the offender. Perhaps he was too drunk to remember, but that doesn't change anything regarding the criminal charge unless the state statute spells out an exception for drunk city councilmen. Let the grand jury make that decision. In fact, in some states possessing a firearm while intoxicated would lead to an additional charge.

One more thought. If you don't charge the councilman, you kind of open up a big can of worms. Why didn't you charge him? Because he's a politician, and he not bound by the same rules at the common folk? What about any other past (or future) prisoners that have been charged with bringing a weapon into a jail, what makes their circumstances any different? And if the deputy is fired or given a massive suspension, he might considering lawyering up if the councilman isn't charged.
TimRob  [Member]
4/14/2009 9:15:47 PM
The first night on the street as a patrol officer after graduating from of the Academy, I was riding with an FTO Sgt. on patrol. We got a call to assist in a chase of a suspect wanted for assault and battery with intent to kill and pointing a firearm. They caught the guy, who bailed out of his car, on foot behind a housing project where officers were working a special detail. The Sgt. and I located and searched the jump car as two officers walked the suspect back to our location. The patro Lt.arrived and told them to hand the prisoner off to another officer who was on duty. They turned him over to that officer who "searched' the supsect and put him in the patrol car. The Lt. told me to go ride with the other officer to the station and watch the prisoner get booked in. We rode the two miles to the station, took the prisoner out and marched him inside. The other officer took him over to the counter and uncuffed him and told him to empty his pockets (another bad move). The guy did and then he was placed in a holding cell. I called dispatch to get a booking number and then walked to the counter to look at his property. Among the items the prionser removed from his pockets was a baggie with 12 .357 magnum hollow-point rounds. I looked at the baggie and motioned to the other officer that we needed to search him again, as I knew there was not gun found in the car that he had jumped out of. We took the guy out of the cell and into the bathroom. I told him to put his hands up and asked if he had a weapon, and he nodded yes. I asked if it was in his pants and he stated yes. I told him not to move and told the other officer to cover me, which he did. I unbuttoned the guys jeans and there in his crotch was a stainless Rossi 4 inch .357 magnum, loaded with hollow-points. This guy had been in a holding cell right in the squad room with the both of us unhandcuffed and armed to the teeth! I've never forgotten that night and make sure that I always search anyone before I put them in my car or take possession of them, to include the balls!
hrt4me  [Team Member]
4/14/2009 9:34:06 PM
Ricardo Alfonso Cerna

video on Snopes.com
Nine5Three  [Team Member]
4/14/2009 9:53:42 PM
That Cerna video scares the shit out of me every time I see it.
carbine_red  [Team Member]
4/14/2009 10:14:17 PM


Obviously the arresting/searching officer screwed up royally by not finding the gun on your person. That being said, in my state, it's a felony to knowingly bring/possess a firearm into a jail/corrections facility. Doesn't matter if the officer missed it in the search, you still knowly brought it into a control environment. Therefore you also screwed up royally by not informing the officer(s) of the gun. I'm very surprised they didn't charge you with a weapons offence.

If I were the supervisor, that officer would have been suspended, but you would also be hit with the felony for sure.

On offense, but you both f'ed up, and both got lucky you didn't face more serious consequences.



So taking a gun into a jail is a felony but failing to appropriately search someone get suspended. Why shouldn't the officer(s) involved bare just as
much responsibility as the criminal.

HKocher  [Team Member]
4/15/2009 1:29:07 AM
Originally Posted By carbine_red:


Obviously the arresting/searching officer screwed up royally by not finding the gun on your person. That being said, in my state, it's a felony to knowingly bring/possess a firearm into a jail/corrections facility. Doesn't matter if the officer missed it in the search, you still knowly brought it into a control environment. Therefore you also screwed up royally by not informing the officer(s) of the gun. I'm very surprised they didn't charge you with a weapons offence.

If I were the supervisor, that officer would have been suspended, but you would also be hit with the felony for sure.

On offense, but you both f'ed up, and both got lucky you didn't face more serious consequences.



So taking a gun into a jail is a felony but failing to appropriately search someone get suspended.


I'm not sure I'm following you. Are you saying the officer should also face criminal charges? If so, that's just idiotic. Show me the state statute that covers shitty prisoner searches and perhaps we can have an intelligent conversation about this issue. Here's a hint, there is no such law, it's DEPARTMENT POLICY. The deputy didn't violate any laws, therefore he can't face any criminal charges. The worst that can happen is department discipline, which probably ranges from suspension up to the possibility of termination.

Why shouldn't the officer(s) involved bare just as much responsibility as the criminal.


Are you really serious? What screwed up moral compass do you possess that leads you to believe that a police officer who makes a mistake should be held to the same level of responsibility as the person that actually commits a criminal offense??? I'm dumbfounded by your statement.

Did the deputy screw up? Absolutely. Should he be punished? Absolutely. While we're on the topic, any cop who claims they have never missed something on a prisoner search (not necessarily a weapon) is either a liar or hasn't been on the job very long. This incident should serve as a reminder to us. Don't think for a minute that I'm defending the deputy, but I'm certainly not going to defend the offender that knowingly brought the handgun into jail. Seriously, WTF?
Bama-Shooter  [Team Member]
4/15/2009 7:41:29 AM
Since we are talking about missed gun stories. During a time when we had a couple of cars down, I would have to go to my LT's house and get his car for my shifts. Part of my SOP is check the fluids, lights, sirens, sweep the trunk, check under seats and pull the backseat out (we don't have the plastic seats) and check that area. This one night when I pulled the backseat out I found .25 auto laying under the cushion.

If LT had been following SOP of check your car at the beginning of the shift and check the backseat after each transport then he would have found the gun instead of me.
carbine_red  [Team Member]
4/15/2009 1:36:31 PM
Originally Posted By HKocher:
Originally Posted By carbine_red:


Obviously the arresting/searching officer screwed up royally by not finding the gun on your person. That being said, in my state, it's a felony to knowingly bring/possess a firearm into a jail/corrections facility. Doesn't matter if the officer missed it in the search, you still knowly brought it into a control environment. Therefore you also screwed up royally by not informing the officer(s) of the gun. I'm very surprised they didn't charge you with a weapons offence.

If I were the supervisor, that officer would have been suspended, but you would also be hit with the felony for sure.

On offense, but you both f'ed up, and both got lucky you didn't face more serious consequences.



So taking a gun into a jail is a felony but failing to appropriately search someone get suspended.


I'm not sure I'm following you. Are you saying the officer should also face criminal charges? If so, that's just idiotic. Show me the state statute that covers shitty prisoner searches and perhaps we can have an intelligent conversation about this issue. Here's a hint, there is no such law, it's DEPARTMENT POLICY. The deputy didn't violate any laws, therefore he can't face any criminal charges. The worst that can happen is department discipline, which probably ranges from suspension up to the possibility of termination.

Why shouldn't the officer(s) involved bare just as much responsibility as the criminal.


Are you really serious? What screwed up moral compass do you possess that leads you to believe that a police officer who makes a mistake should be held to the same level of responsibility as the person that actually commits a criminal offense??? I'm dumbfounded by your statement.

Did the deputy screw up? Absolutely. Should he be punished? Absolutely. While we're on the topic, any cop who claims they have never missed something on a prisoner search (not necessarily a weapon) is either a liar or hasn't been on the job very long. This incident should serve as a reminder to us. Don't think for a minute that I'm defending the deputy, but I'm certainly not going to defend the offender that knowingly brought the handgun into jail. Seriously, WTF?


Might have a been a little strong but a suspension with pay isn't what I consider a punishment and certainly nowhere near the a felony.

What would happen if someone was shot because of a missed gun?
Would that warrant criminal charges for the person that missed the gun in a search?
Tango7  [Moderator]
4/15/2009 1:55:03 PM
Hell, the Lt. on the Tac Team who was my instructor in TEMS was so thorough during our session on searching I still send him flowers on the anniversary of the class.
HKocher  [Team Member]
4/15/2009 2:04:04 PM
Originally Posted By carbine_red:
Might have a been a little strong but a suspension with pay isn't what I consider a punishment and certainly nowhere near the a felony.


I never said suspension WITH pay. Is it a fireable offense? Potentially. If I was the sheriff I probably wouldn't fire a deputy with an otherwise outstanding record for a single (although massive) mistake. If the guy was a f'up, and this was the last of a string of bad decisions, then termination would be a likely option.

I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree. You seem to think the punishment of the deputy who made a mistake should match the punishment of the person who actually committed the crime. That doesn't make much any sense to me. Like I said, one is a criminal matter and is up to the courts to decide, the second is a department matter, and has to be settled by the employer.


What would happen if someone was shot because of a missed gun?
Would that warrant criminal charges for the person that missed the gun in a search?


Well that would certainly open up the path for a massive civil suit against the dept. and the officer. Again, if you can find a law that covers sloppy prisoner searches, then please post it. You can't charge someone for an offense that doesn't exist. If a prisoner sneaks a gun into a jail and shoots someone, those are his own actions and done of his own free will. The deputy didn't force that chain of events, he only failed to prevent it by conducting a sloppy search. Again, not a criminal matter, but certainly a dept. policy violation, and certainly he would face civil liability.

Again, not defending the deputy, but he didn't do anything criminal.
Pforty  [Member]
4/17/2009 1:16:16 PM
Guys, I don't post on AR15 much, but since I grew up in Anderson, IN let me shed a little light on this matter.

Ollie Dixon, the city councilman, has been arrested 4 times now for driving under the influence. He also was in possesion of a firearm inside jail, a B felony like the article said. He will get off scott free, or have some probation and community service. Mr Dixon is a democrat. The mayor is a democrat. The sheriff is a democrat. The prosecutor is a democrat. The prosecutor employs one of Mr. Dixon's relatives. If a policeman did something like this, he would probably be suspended with pay and later terminated. I'm sure you could substitute "teacher" or "firefighter" for the word policeman too.

What is even more sad is that the people of this city keep re-electing him. His district is the "west side" of town where most of the minorities live. I guess they don't know any better, or the opposition can't find someone to run against him. In the mid 90's when I was in high school, we had to attend and observe a city council meeting as part of our government class (probably a good idea). One of the things I noticed immediately was that all of the city council members were dressed up in white shirts and ties. They looked like the kind of "important" people you would see on a typical city council in a city of 70,000 people. All of them except for Mr. Dixon. He was wearing a sweatshirt and blue jeans. I have never spoken to this man, but his appearance at the meeting left an impression on me as to his character.

If you are a prosecutor, how can you not charge this guy? He either had a firearm inside jail or he didn't. It was pretty evident he did, so what is so complicated about that? A "special" prosecutor was appointed for this case, which is total BS. The "special" prosecutor is from the next county over, and is also a democrat. Does anyone see a pattern here?
Pforty  [Member]
4/17/2009 1:25:52 PM
I would also like to point out that the sheriff returned the firearm to Mr. Dixon a short time after his arrest. I thought that all firearms used in suspicion of a crime were typically confiscated as evidence and not returned until after the trial ?

TheDamnYankee3599  [Member]
4/29/2009 3:21:43 AM
If you want to see a Jail staff go balistic forget to pat down your prisoners.
During my four years in our jail I have I have had a Deputy give a suspect back his .38 so it would go in his property.
I have had a suspect have a NAA .22 on his belt buckle ( talk about pucker factor) and several LEO's with years of exspirence miss steak knives and large meat knives. But they would find the small crack rock in the shirt pocket.

Just my .002
snuffy19608  [Team Member]
4/29/2009 8:49:42 PM
From the EMS side- got called out one day to assist the PD on a woman who emailed her boyfriend that she was going to kill herself. He called PD and an officer went to the residence and found 1 half-in-the-bag hardbody and 1 S/W 44 revolver under the chair she was sitting in. After some discussion (about 30 minutes worth) officer decides she needs to go to hospital for a mental health eval.

My (female) partner and I arrive and climb the outside stairwell to the apartment, PD meets us on the porch and explains everything (hardbody is now is now alone) and then we enter. After some MORE discussion she agrees to walk out to the truck. While this is going on I'm talking to the downstairs neighbor who says our friend was waving a big knife around on the porch earlier. I ask where the knife is- neighbor points down into the yard. There's a pretty close copy of the knife from Rambo laying in the yard- 10 feet from the swingset where about 3 kids are playing.

After that knife made its way back upstairs in the company of me, my partner told the patient we needed to search her and her purse before we left. She hands over the purse- did you know you can hide a whole 6-pack of beer in one? Then my partner asks to search her. She starts complaining for the first time since we got there. RED FLAG!! Now this woman is about 35, obviously works out, and is wearing spandex bike shorts and a spandex jogbra with a fleece pullover over the bra. There's NOT that much to search, but she keeps trying to talk her way out of it.

Finally the officer orders her to take the fleece off or he will. Guess what? Not 1, not 2, but THREE knives in their sheaths stuck in the back of her shorts! The officer almost fell over- his comment was "Jesus, I had my back to her several times!"

That was very early in my career- since then I don't care WHO says they searched the patient/suspect/witness/dirtbag, I have them searched AGAIN. It's caught stuff more than once, like the kid who was being commited for trying to light his parents house on fire and Crisis didn't think it was important to take his matches,lighter and smokes away. Ambulance full of O2 + Bic lighter = bad day.
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